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Themen | 036/2022 (03.09.2022)
  • A house divided
    American policy is splintering state by state, with profound consequences
  • Britain can’t build
    Why the country struggles to create enough homes, roads, reservoirs and power stations
  • Lurkers below
    Technologists are designing more fearsome naval mines, and better ways to defeat them
  • Food for thought
    Should every schoolchild eat free?
  • Margin brawl
    The cloud-computing giants are battling to protect fat margins
  • The AA economy
    Gautam Adani and Mukesh Ambani vie for the commanding heights of their country’s economy
Themen | 037/2022 (10.09.2022)
  • LAND, OIL AND ICE
    ANCHORAGE, FAIRBANKS, KOTZEBUE AND THE NATIONAL PETROLEUM RESERVE IN ALASKA: Glimpsing the world’s past and future in the Arctic
  • Trump’s tropical disciple
    RIO DE JANEIRO: Jair Bolsonaro is poised to lose the Brazilian election. He will not go quietly
  • The merge
    Crypto prices have crashed, but the technology is about to radically improve
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Themen | 038/2022 (17.09.2022)
  • The end of an era
    Despite social and political upheaval, Britain’s longest-reigning sovereign strengthened the monarchy
  • The world’s biggest bet on India
    MUMBAI: What Tata’s $90bn pivot to its home market says about the planet’s fifth-biggest economy
  • Groaning
    SHANGHAI: China’s Ponzi-like property market is undermining faith in the government
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Themen | 039/2022 (24.09.2022)
  • Docks, stocks and many floating barrels
    DOHA, DUBAI AND SHARJAH Russia’s war has rammed a gun barrel into the mechanics of the energy trade. A great re-engineering is under way
  • Peddling Putin’s piffle
    BUENOS AIRES, HANOI, JOHANNESBURG AND TOKYO Russia is trying hard to persuade the global south to accept its version of events in Ukraine
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Themen | 040/2022 (01.10.2022)
  • The Prince among princelings
    Xi Jinping is the most powerful Chinese leader since Mao. The Economist has spent nine months exploring what shapes his thinking
  • Dispatch from a forgotten war
    IRUMU, MUTWANGA AND TCHEGERA The government says martial law has restored a degree of calm. Yet 5.5m people are still too afraid to return to their homes
  • Pounded land
    The chancellor’s budget has spooked markets, hurt growth and shredded the government’s authority
  • Climbing the ladder
    Six decades after the Cuban missile crisis, the world is again worried about nuclear war
  • Bail-outs for everyone!
    SAN FRANCISCO How governments came to underwrite the entire economy
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Porträt von Economist

Der Economist ist eine der weltweit ältesten Zeitschriften und erscheint seit 1843. Das Magazin erscheint wöchentlich und wird in London herausgegeben.

Welche Inhalte bietet Economist ?

Inhaltlich ist der Economist durch seine liberale Ausrichtung und die internationale Berichterstattung gekennzeichnet. Das Magazin erscheint in englischer Sprache und wird in sage und schreibe 200 Ländern herausgegeben. Die Schwerpunktthemen des Economist sind Politik, Wirtschaft und Finanzen. Darüber hinaus finden sich aber immer auch Artikel aus der Welt der Wissenschaft sowie Kunst und Kultur. Bekannt wurde der Economist unter anderem durch seine Indizes. So wird mit dem „Big-Mac-Index“ die Kaufkraft einer Währung bestimmt, zudem existieren auch der „Demokratie-Index“ und der „Global Peace Index“, die weltweite Beachtung finden.

Wer sollte Economist lesen?

Mit einer weltweiten Auflage von 1,6 Millionen verkauften Exemplaren (Stand 2016) zählt der Economist zu den bekanntesten Zeitschriften der Welt. Die Leserinnen und Leser zeichnen sich durch eine überdurchschnittliche Bildung sowie ein hohes politisches und ökonomisches Interesse aus.

Das Besondere an Economist

Kennzeichnend für den Economist ist die fehlende namentliche Kennzeichnung der Artikel. Noch nicht einmal der Chefredakteur wird erwähnt.

  • erscheint seit 1843
  • in englischer Sprache
  • liberale Ausrichtung

Der Verlag hinter Economist

Der Economist ist ein Produkt des Unternehmens The Economist Newspaper Limited, London. In der Economist Group erscheint zudem die Lifestyle– Zeitschrift „Intelligent Life“ bzw. „1843“.

Alternativen zu Economist

Der Economist ist Teil der politischen International Zeitschriften. Wem der Sinn nach noch mehr englischsprachiger Lektüre steht, der ist mit der Financial Times Mo-Fr oder der Atlantic Monthly bestens beraten.

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In der aktuellen Ausgabe von Economist

  • How not to run a country
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  • The Prince
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  • The rate shock
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  • Is this time different?
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  • The Prince among princelings
    Xi Jinping is the most powerful Chinese leader since Mao. The Economist has spent nine months exploring what shapes his thinking
  • Nothing to celebrate
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  • The very long winter
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  • Steady on
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  • Dispatch from a forgotten war
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